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draco84oz

The Names of the Covenant

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As a follow-on from this thread, I thought I would start a similar thread for the Covenant's units.

Prometheus-Class Dreadnought - In Greek mythology, Prometheus was the Titan who sculpted man out of clay, and defied Zeus to give humans the ability to heal themselves, and the gift of fire. As punishment for this theft, Prometheus is chained to a rock, where each day an eagle eats his liver, which would grow back and be eaten again the next day.

Diophantus-Class Assault Carrier - A Greek mathematician who worked in Alexandria, best known for developing algebra. His best works were the books known as Arithmetica.

Aristotle-Class Battleship - a famous Greek philosopher, who laid some of the foundations of Western Philosphy. Also one of the fathers of the study of logic, zoology, the scientific method, as well as physics that were only superseded by Newtonian physics.

Descartes-Class Battleship - Rene Descartes was a French Philosopher and Mathematician from the 16th-17th centuries, known as one of the fathers of Western Philosophy, as well as pioneer in the areas of algebra and geometry- he was responsible for the development o the Cartesian Coordinate system, the modern method of 3-dimensional point plotting.

Pericles-Class Carrier - Greek statesman and general during the Peloponnesian Wars. Also rebuilt much of the Acropolis, including the Pathenon, in Athens in 468 BC.

Menedaius-Class Support Ship - the only reference I can find to this Spartan General was in the Battle of Olpae, in 426 BC between the forces of Athens and Sparta. Menedaius was the deputy commander of the Spartan force, and took over when the original commander, Eurylochus, was killed.

 

 

Hippasus-Class Battlecruiser - A Greek mathematician and philosopher, sometimes credited with the discovery of irrational numbers (any number that cannot be expressed as a ratio eg. pi)

Fresnel-Class Cruier - Augustin-Jean Fresnel was a French engineer whose main contribution was to Wave Optics. He developed the Fresnel lens, a lighthouse lens that intensifies the light beam, and many of his equations are still used in modern computer graphics rendering programs.

Zeno-Class Armoured Cruiser - there are several Greek philosophers named Zeno, but I think the most likely candidate is Zeno of Elea, who is known for his paradoxes (including the paradox of Achilles and the Tortoise), and one of the minds behind the concept of a mathematical infinity.

Kepler-Class Light Carrier - Johannes Kepler was a German astronomer and mathematician, known for his laws of planetary motion

Cleomedes-Class Cruiser - a Greek astronomer known for work on planetary motion and optics (specifically refraction)

Plato-Class Light Cruiser a Greek philosopher, and teacher of Aristotle, who founded the Athenian Academy - the first higher education institute in the western world.

Praxilla-Class Hunter-Killer Submarine - a female Greek poet from the 5th century BC

 

Plutarch-Class Destroyer - a Greek writer, who was one of the priests at the Oracle of Delphi, and who wrote numerous biographies. Influential on modern western literature.

Diogenes-Class Frigate - lots of Diogenes in the greek philosophers, but i'm going for Diogenes of Sinope, who lived simply (in a barrel), spoke out against corruption, embarrassed Plato, and mocked Alexander the Great. Considered a father of Cynicism. Also, Diogenes Syndrome is a modern mental disorder characterised by self-neglect.

Thales-Class Corvette - one of the earliest, if not the first, Greek Philosophers, he is considered one of the possible fathers of Science, rejecting mythological explanations of natural events. Also one of the first mathematicians, and discoverer of Thales's theorem

Galen-Class Escort - a Greek/Roman physician, who first wrote the theory that the brain controlled the entire body.

Newton-Class Repair Ship - Sir Issac Newton, the physicist who famously required a bit of botanical blunt force trauma to come up with the laws of gravity, was actually a brilliant scientist in his time - his works on the laws of motion and universal gravity laid the foundations for modern Astrophysics. He is probably best known for his three laws of motion that form one of the bedrocks of modern physics, but he was also the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge - a post that was previously held by Stephen Hawking (the 17th holder of the position).

 

Euclid-Class Dreadnought - a Greek philosopher, Euclid is described as the "Father of Geometry". He wrote may early theories on perspective, the geometry of cones and spheres, as well as number theory.

Epicurus-Class Sky Fortress - a Greek philosopher, who helped develop the atomic theory, but also wrote on the origins of pleasure and pain. One of his teachings is that in many cases, a phenomenon may have multiple explanations, and that we must take care not to dismiss any theory too hastily. He was one of the earliest to postulate the causes of an eclipse, and the cause of thunder. He also spoke against the idea of a geocentric universe (earth at the center of it), but mainly because the theory was one of Aristotle's.

Daedelus-Class Large Flyer - a mythical Greek inventor and craftsman, who built the Labyrinth that Cretean King Minos imprisoned the Minotaur in. Father of Icarus

 

Hyperbius-Class Control Flyer - several figures in ancient Greece share this name, everything from legendary figures to who interacted with the Gods, to a couple of inventors - one of whom was credited with building the wall around the Acropolis with his brother.

Icarus-Class Medium Flyer - son of Daedelus. After the Labyrinth was built, Minos imprisoned Daedalus and Icarus in a tower so that the secret of the Labyrinth would not be found out. Daedalus fashioned a set of wings for himself and Icaus out of bird's feathers and wax, and the two flew away from Crete. However, Icarus flew higher and higher to see the whole world beneath him, and flew too close to the sun, melting the wax holding the wings together. He then fell into the sea.

Capek-Class Medium Flyer - The only version I can find is Karel Čapek, a Czech science-fiction writer. Best known for using the word "robota" in his work to describe artifical beings. The word actually means "serf labour" or "hard work" in Czech. But its an intersting choice, since Capek was born in 1890, well after the World War ended.

Ptolemy-Class Medium Bomber - A Greek/Roman writer and mathematician, who wrote on astronomy and geography. Also, the Ptolomeys were a line of Pharaohs in classical Egypt.

 

Theon-Class Light Interceptor - there are two Theons of antiquity that this could refer to: Theon of Smyrna was a Greek philosopher in the first century CE whose work included the foundations of Number Theory. Theon of Alexandria was a Greek scholar in the 4th Century CE who worked closely with Euclid, and whose daughter, Hypatia, was a brilliant scholar in her own right.

Pytheus-Class Light Bomber - also spelled Pythius, one of the architects of the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Alea-Class Escort Flyer - most likely candidate is that of a greek soldier who was reported to have invented Tabula, an ancestor of the game Backgammon. The name derives from the Latin word for "random/fate/luck". (cheers Nucreum)

 

Herodotus-Class Mobile Airfield - a Greek Philosopher, regarded as the Father of History, writing about systematic research.

Archimedes-Class Command Robot - also known as the "Eureka streaker", a Greek mathematican who wrote about density, hydrostatics, statics, and the lever. Inventor of the Archimedes screw (which the Covenant seem to use as their main naval propulsion method)

Aronnax-Class Robot - Professor Pierre Aronnax was the biologist hired by the US Navy and subsequently a "guest" aboard Captain Nemo's Nautilus in the book Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea by Jules Verne (published in 1870). (The Aronnax was originally a submarine, but changed to a multi-purpose robot in the 2.0 ruleset, which is why the name choice might be a bit confusing).

Callimachus-Class Time Orb - a Greek poet and scholar who worked at the Library of Alexandria.

 

Skorpios-Class Bombard - an Island in the Ionian Sea, owned by the Onassis family. However, I have a feeling its more a derivative of the animal name Scorpion.

Socrates-Class Bombard - a Greek philosopher, and teacher of Plato

Atticus-Class Medium Walker - a Greek philosopher, and contemporary of Plato. (cheers, Catalyst2), Also, Atticus is Latin for "Man of Attica", the ancient region where Athens is located.

 

Orpheus-Class Drone Controller - a mythical Greek figure, and master musican who could charm any living thing with his music. He descended into Hades to retrieve his wife, Eurydice, which is the subject of several musical pieces (in the film Titanic, the string quartet play Orpheus and the Underworld by Offenbach to try to cheer up the crowd).

Colossus-Class Small Robot - another word for giant, most likely refers to the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Ancient Wonders of the world.

Xenophon-Class Ironclad - greek soldier and historian, who wrote histories based on his own time (4th century BCE)

Janus-Class Portal - the two-faced Roman God of beginnings and transitions or, more simply, change, as well as presiding war and peace. He was uniquely Roman - there is no definitive classical Greek equivalent.

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Herotodus-Class Mobile Airfield - a Greek Philosopher, regarded as the Father of History, writing about systematic research.

Herodotus :P

 

Nice job. ;)

 

I play CoA for 3 reasons:

1) "What the... an army of Antarctica? Seriously, I need it."

2) "The ships are beautiful. Mix of hi-tech sci-fi and steampunk."

3) "The names are greet (pun intended), philosophy strikes back!"

 

In fact, I play DW because I saw a Naval Starter Set of CoA in my LGS. I had never heard of Spartan Games before.

[/mylife]

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@draco84oz - great list, shows the time and effort you put in on the research.

 

For the Atticus-Class Medium Walker, I would go with the Atticus that was the Platonist philosopher and author of a lost Plato commentary, largely because it fits better with the theme than the other alternatives.

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When some of the covenat stuff was first announced I was hopeing that the frigate would be equipped with some kind of targeting array (a bit the like the US Shroud Mages Illuminator frigate) due to Diogenes' lamp.

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I recognised some of the names, I must have retained some of the knowledge I gleamed at college philosophy class. Since we have such a heavy Greek naming scheme on the class of our ships what would be a good naming scheme for the ships themselves? I usually go with Latin for such things (my handle is Latin), which is what I thought of doing and now that I have some of my ships halfway painted I want to get a naming structure for my fleet.

Good job on the research and putting it all together good to see where our penguin roots come from!

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The CoA capitals that I've named in my fleet are named after great scientists.  My DN is named after Sir Francis Bacon, the father of empiricism (it's a shame that we will probably never, for obvious reasons, have a CoA class named after him ...)

 

Of all the ships in DW, I think the Galen is my favourite naming choice.  It's just so elegant and clever.

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I love that the Covenant seem to have a standard Greek feel and then you realise that they are all the names of ancient philosophers and scientists, with more modern figures mixed in for good measure. The humanist faction! 

 

Personally I name my ships after scientists, mathematicians, historians and so on as well. But I also throw the odd classic name in there, like my Dreadnought, the Caestus Pax, or "Fist of Peace," which really works with the Covenants aims, and sounds pretty awesome too!

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My Primary battleship has always been called the Euclid, though I am sure that might get pinched for a new ship class one day!

 

My Carrier is called the Alansbane which on the one hand sounds quite good and on the other it is a vessel that an opponent of mine called Alan utterly despises. The name only incites him to further fury!

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That was ironically the first thing I thought of when I saw the name of the HQ flyer in the announcement. I knew I saw it in a thread somewhere!

Maybe the "OP Euclid"? (original penguin)

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The general scheme of Covenant naming seems to be knowledge. Philosophers, Mathematicians, Inventors, Poets and even a god of knowledge and forethought. I imagine that you could also add astronomers as well as other great thinkers, gods/goddesses of wisdom, even playwrights, all of which fit into the covenant mantra of furthering knowledge for the betterment of mankind.

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Question on the naming structure for covenant forces. Most of the names I have seen in the campaigns start with an acronym designation and I am curious if I have it right.

CAS - Covenant Air Ship

CNS - Covenant Naval Ship

CLS - Covenant Land Ship

Are those correct? I saw in Pacific Cyclone that one of the Epicurus was names CSS, I was thrown off as an Icarus had the CAS designation later in the campaign. Just a curiosity of mine as I am getting ready to name my ships (hopefully)

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Alea-Class Escort Flyer - most likely candidate is that of a greek soldier who was reported to have invented Tabula, an ancestor of the game Backgammon. The name derives from aléatoire, which is latin for "random".

Aléatoire is French for "random". Latin is... "Alea" which means "random/fate/luck" but also "a die/gambling". ;)

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So they name their stuff after people/gods who are seen to enrich mankind.

Cool, :)

There is no gods in names ^^

I think it would be ironic to give names of gods in a science based faction :lol: 

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There is no gods in names ^^

I think it would be ironic to give names of gods in a science based faction :lol:

 

Hi, I'm the guy with a fleet named things like Nemhain, Andraste, Agrona, Morrigan. Irony is the basis for all insane laughter in my fleet. The first thing I do with a new ship is look up the celtic gods list on wikipedia and search for a suitable god or goddess.

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Hi, I'm the guy with a fleet named things like Nemhain, Andraste, Agrona, Morrigan. Irony is the basis for all insane laughter in my fleet. The first thing I do with a new ship is look up the celtic gods list on wikipedia and search for a suitable god or goddess.

I mean, it would be ironic for having "God name class xxxx", wasn't speaking about players choices. ;)

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Wasn't pytheus a Greek god? Maybe it just sounds like it to me.

While talking about names I know our naval start with CNS (covenant naval ship) but what about air? Is it CSS (Sky) or CAS (Air)? I have seen them both ways in the fluff, or does it matter?

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