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Count Lootu

Official Thread: Habsburg Union Of Austro-Hungary

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Dear Spartans

I´d love to see some fluff about the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy (Kaiser und Kö*** KuK). As Austria WAS one of the major powers in central Europe (specially the arch-enemy of Prussia). It appears, that there is absolutely NO fluff about the KuK at all. I know, that DW is not our real world, but it´s like you left out Russia, or Britain...

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Dear Spartans

I´d love to see some fluff about the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy (Kaiser und Kö*** KuK). As Austria WAS one of the major powers in central Europe (specially the arch-enemy of Prussia). It appears, that there is absolutely NO fluff about the KuK at all. I know, that DW is not our real world, but it´s like you left out Russia, or Britain...

As I read it, there is no KuK anymore. From the website:

Taking advantage of Austrian weaknesses after their defeats by Napoleon, the Prussians annexed the former territories of the Habsburg Empire into their own dominion.

So basically, they've been subsumed by the Prussian Empire. That said, I saw a nicely-done KuK-flavoured Prussian fleet on a blog recently.

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Commander Chris, might this be the link? http://warpooch.blog...opian-wars.html

Honestly, it's not very good. Whoever did that obviously hasn't had a single shred of reference. What's with the Hungarian cross? Why is it flying a modern Hungarian flag?

I plan on doing better :D

Certainly, and I'll give you extra props if you paint your ships in Montecuccolin! :D Yes, the blog isn't a proper KuK fleet (nicely done referred to the painting, not exactly accuracy), but I think it feels decent enough as a "subfaction" of the Prussians with a smattering of what Anglo-Americans think they know of Vienna. :lol:

EDIT: Also, I am just a Piefke with both sides of the family tree rooted in Prussia. We don't know more about Austria than Schmäh and Schnitzel, as you surely are aware. ;)

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Servus, then, and greetings among neighbours!

Yeah, a Montecuccolin paint scheme would look really nice, even if it's the peacetime color scheme - around 1914 the Navy switched to the "Hausian" scheme.

If you ever happen to get to Vienna, make sure to check out the Heeresgeschichtliche Museum... there is a breathtaking cut-away model of the Viribus Unitis in 1:25 scale on display. Awesome details, the Admiral's quarters even have flowers on the tables... and, as a small detail: the model was actually built by the same shipyard that built the real Viribus Unitis, as a present for Franz Ferdinand.

Here's a link to some pictures: http://www.modellmarine.de/index.php?option=com_imagebrowser&view=gallery&folder=viribus-unitis-wien&Itemid=55

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Hello von Klinkerhoffen,

it's just one of many topics I'm interested in. I've got a lot of reading to do before I can claim any significant knowledge. But since I got into the tabletop hobby after doing about 10 years of scale modelling, I have some resources.

And yes, the Viribus Unitis in the link above sports the Hausian scheme, in use from 23rd of December (the date of the official Navy regulation to use the Hausian Scheme) to 1918. The pictures aren't that great, by the way. The Heeresgeschichtliche Museum is notoriously cruel to photographers (it was a fortification, originally, so the lighting inside is just plain atrocious).

The Montecuccolin paint scheme would be (in a nutshell):

Hull and superstructure in Olive Green

Waterline pink

Submerged hull in a "poisonous green color", usually a dark green is used.

Exterior decking in Teak wood

The "poisonous green" is because of the special paint used on the underbelly, a copper based compound to protect the ship against algae and such. The compound also messed with the waterline, so the red color would fade and change over time, becoming rather pinkish.

You can see a 1:700 scale model of the SMS Radetzky here: http://www.doppeladl...uk/radetzky.htm

EDIT: Or see my next posting in this thread, there are bigger and better pictures.

If one would want to paint a ship in wartime colors, the consensus amongst scale modellers is:

Hull and superstructure in a blueish-gray color

Waterline: faded red

Submerged hull: dark green

Hope this helps, and feel free to ask more questions if they pop up, I'll try and answer them as best I can.

Oh, and a little footnote:

I´d love to see some fluff about the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy (Kaiser und Kö*** KuK).

Did the board software actually censor the last part of "Kaiser und..." because these three letters can also be used to call out African-Americans in a derogative way? :D

And "K.u. K." actually means "kaiserlich und königlich" ("Imperial and Royal"), denoting the status of Austrias Emperor as Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary.

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Servus, then, and greetings among neighbours!

Yeah, a Montecuccolin paint scheme would look really nice, even if it's the peacetime color scheme - around 1914 the Navy switched to the "Hausian" scheme.

Well, my reasoning would be that everybody and their cat/dog/mom paints their Prussians some shade of grey, so a juicy olive (preferably not the drab variety) would be a nice change. :P

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I was thinking of adding a Magenta and a squadron of Lyons to my Prussians, once I got the hang of the game.

They would stand in for appropriate Prussian ships (the Magenta, after some conversions, substituting the Emperor, and maybe the Lyons could be a stand-in for Saxonies?), counting as an allied k.u.k. Naval Battle Group.

And since the Austrian-Hungarian Navy was re-painting all of their ships from Montecuccolin to Hausian (and never really finished it), some of these ships could still be painted in Montecuccolin. It would surely add some variety into "ze glorious uniform grey of ze Prussian Kriegsmarine". Hell, for some sh*ts and giggles I could paint a single Lyon still in "Victorian" (pre-1906).

So, just for comparison:

Wikipedia has a good picture of the SMS Budapest in "Hausian": http://upload.wikime...9%2C_Modell.jpg

And here's the SMS Erzherzog Karl in "Montecuccolin": http://666kb.com/i/c2ww3awafwpzle7ak.jpg

(both models are from the Heeresgeschichtliches Museum, as well. Damn, I need to get to Vienna soon.)

By the way:

Count Lootu, Mods & Admins, I hope you're okay with me hi-jacking this thread and steering it into a completely different direction. If any of you think it's better to snip off this part of the discussion and move it to "Modelling" or "Painting", please do so.

Edited by Dr. F.G. Hobo
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No joy on the RAL number, I guess, since Montecuccolin was retired almost 14 years before the RAL standard was introduced. But you might want to take a look at #6004 or #6020, they might be close.

I've got the standard mixing "recipe" here (and I'll try to translate it)

46% Kalkgrau (lime gray)

14% Ockergelb (yellow ocher)

2% Schwarz (black)

9% Weiß (white)

1% Ultramarin (ultramarine)

27% Leinöl (linseed oil)

1% Terpentinöl (turpentine)

That's the original mixture. It has been altered a few times, though.

For Hausian, it's

66% Lithopone (email white, Lithopone is the pigment, not an actual color.)

5 % Schwarz (black)

1 % Ultramarinblau (ultramarine)

28 % Leinöl (linseed oil)

Good starting points for Montecuccolin would be Humbrol 31 for the "upper green" and a 3:1 mix of Humbrol 88 and white for the "lower green", if my Google-Fu is still strong.

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Excuse me?

 

As an austrian person who did say in another thread how my prussians are basically just kuk with labels filed off, i am offended!

 

All hail Franz Ferdinand, god damnit.

 

(Its all in good fun of course ^^, yes austrian sub models would be awesome and i seem to remember that those are actually planned for?)

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