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Basing Land Units

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My gaming group has decided to dip it's collective toe into the Armoured Clash pool (and land combat in DW). I've never based anything other than 28mm and was wondering what advice people had? I'm leaning towards snow bases for my small RC force. Cheers.

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for my Prussians and brits I glue on sand before undercoating (not too coarse or it looks odd and come too high up the sides) then paint over with with scorched brown, drybrush graveyard earth and wash devlan mud (old names, sorry). I then use pva and graveyard earth to make churned up mud tracks behind them then but a little bit of grassy stuff down in clumps (again not too high or it looks like really big grassy hillocks).

 

For my COA I do snow. I would recommend sticking som sand down here as well then painting it white and putting snow flock over this as just flat bases look quite un-realistic at this scale and the sand give an unevan texture, some larger grains help too. 

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When you mean basing, do you mean what do you use for bases, or how do you texture the bases? All the armoured models come with a pvc base to fit, so just use that. And although you can get away without using the bases in Dystopian Wars (in most cases - large walkers excepted...), you can't really in Armoured Clash  - the coherency rules require you to be in base-to-base contact, so without the bases, your tanks will be tightly packed, which is not that attractive...

 

In terms of texturing, it depends on how far you want to go.

 

The most basic one would be to simply paint the base a grass green.

 

A more advanced method would be to paint it brown instead and then cover it with green flock.

 

The technique I use is to first paint the base a dark brown, then cover the top with modelling sand. This gets washed the same brown, then drybrushed with tan and then buff (light tan). Green flock is then glued in patches over this. For snow bases, I'd start with a few patches of green, but then use white flock over the top of that, and probably in larger quantites than I normally would use.

 

The trick with 1:1200 scale is remember the scale - a small pebble that might look ok at 28m will look like a large boulder at 2mm, so it may pay to filter out your sand.

 

Also, stick with flock rather than static grass - at 2mm, static grass looks like a grass forest rather than actual grass.

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Just use the clear bases, and keep them clear. That way they match every table.

 

The second best approach is find a colour scheme for the base that looks good with your models paint scheme. Due to scale issues,  grass, mud, desert or snow are the only real choices. Even then, it takes some effort. Don't forget the track marks behind, in front and generally around the house/warehouse sized tanks...

 

I've just made up an airfield. I spent some time grinding the already superfine grade of flock in a pestle and mortar for grass,  and it still looks far too coarse. For my next one, I'll try a fine textured paint and drybrush it.

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Just use the clear bases, and keep them clear. That way they match every table.

 

Yes. This. +1 And magnetize the clear bases so they can be dispensed with when loading onto a landing craft or traversing a bridge...

 

I've just made up an airfield. I spent some time grinding the already superfine grade of flock in a pestle and mortar for grass,  and it still looks far too coarse.

 

Yep. Your flock was about the right size for overgrown shrubbery, small trees, or saplings.

 

 

For my next one, I'll try a fine textured paint and drybrush it.

 

Don't. Even that would be too big. Try this instead:

 

P1010050x98.jpg

 

[ The 'grass' on top of the hill / island is nothing but paint. No texture at all. Just paint. And even then it is thicker than grass would be... ]

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Thanks for all the advice! It's too late to magnetize the bases since first thing I did was glue them. Any experience with GW's snow flock? Where's a good place to get a cheap mortar and pestal? Emphasis on 'cheap'.

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Thanks for all the advice! It's too late to magnetize the bases since first thing I did was glue them. Any experience with GW's snow flock? Where's a good place to get a cheap mortar and pestal? Emphasis on 'cheap'.

 

1. No experience with GW's snow flock.

 

1.5 I did try Woodland Scenic's snow flock once and found it easy to work with, quite colorfast, but pebbly. At 1:1200 scale it would look like some army of madmen had covered the ground with large snowballs of the size required to build snowmen.

 

2. Mortar, Pestle: why did you want a set? A quick look at internet shopping results revealed that you can pay as much as you want for a set. I saw prices ranging from $4 - $56. Materials ranging from bamboo to marble. The $4 item was made of white porcelain.

 

2a. It is a product for apothecaries or chefs so, I would try the cooking aisle at a dollar store or a pound store.

 

Edit:

 

3. There is some kind of crafting experience that involves sand and decorative bottles. Craft stores sell colored sand. It is very, very, fine sand. One color available is white sand. If I was going to snow-flock bases at this scale I would be tempted to try that.

 

( I really don't get sand crafting: apparently one buys ordinary bottles of sand in various colors, pours the sand in layers, into empty bottles of various shapes. And thus art happens... )

Edited by Pendrake

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The mortar and pestle were for breaking up clumps of flock which is a problem with the grass I have. Funny story about coloured sand: this couple my wife is friends with decided, at their wedding, to mix two colours of sand together as a symbol of their union. My mother-in-law managed to knock over the jars holding the sand and spilt them all over the carpet.

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I'm using baking powder for snow. Very fine stuff. Just don't confuse it with baking soda as the soda will bubble up with the moisture in the glue.

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I was finishing off my first regiment, so I took some time and did up a progressive shot of how I base my land units

 

DSCF0262

 
1. Basecoat the base and paint it brown (I use Vallejo Chocolate Brown 872)
2. Attach the painted mini with supergule
3. Use pva gule to put modelling sand on the base
4. Wash the sand brown (remember to let the glue dry overnight or you'll end up with glued paint brush bristles)
5. Drybrush with tan (German Camo Beige 821)
6. Drybrush with buff (1:1 mix of German Camo Beige 821:White 951)
7. Use pva gule to attach chunks of flock - i use it to cover up holes in the sand that fell off during painting.
 
For some models, I actually do the base in its entirety first before attaching the model - usually these are large walkers where its difficult to get at the base once the model is attached (eg. Archimedes, Metzger, Taka-Ashi). Most spartan minis are ok to attach before the sand goes on due to their "hard shadow", though.
 
Hope that helps!

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Looking at that one in the bottom right, it makes me think of driving over some farmer's sugar cane crop, or something.

 

Me I've been thinking about stuff like hedgerows and whatnot... will have to see, when it comes to basing time =)

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