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evilsockmonkeyzed

1:48 Scale Prussian A6-V Build

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Bottom cladding finished.

 

This is the basic bottom facet cladding complete:

 

Bottomslopecladding_zps2dcc4630.jpg

 

 

 

Cladding now applied to the fore and aft facets from the merge with the bottom cladding to the layer meeting the Barbette turret cut outs.

 

Doing the facet cladding in sections will allow me to get a more accurate trace for the cladding that will cover the top surface of the barbettes.

 

upperfacetcladding_zpsf8cc77f0.jpg

 

 

The gap between the two facets is intentional.  it is easier to fill the gap with apoxie sculpt and sand the join to a straight profile than to cut the parts perfectly cleanly.  Besides, razor sharp edges on the full scale land ship would be pretty hard to achieve.

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3 chihuahuas count as 1 regular dog.

Late to the party, but... Any "dog" you can kick between the uprights is NOT a dog. Though I suppose ESMZ's cats appreciate the additional self powered toys.

Regardless, I'm really looking forward to seeing this beastie on its treads with infantry following behind. :)

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Waiting on replacement parts for the 3D printer and a delivery from my plywood source.

 

BTW, if you decide to order a printer from a certain manufacturer in Brooklyn NY, USA, you may want to message me for some pointers on what to check on when you open it.  I have no reason to believe that problem I ran into is universal, but neither do I have a reason to believe that it might not be common.  If you know what I mean.

 

Anyway, working on bits of the cladding that can be done with tailings and scraps from the larger areas already covered.

 

Fore and aft of the superstructure...

 

SSCladding02_zpsd2b807c2.jpg

 

 

The bare sections at the ends of the lower part are where the "rails" from the main gun position meet the super structure.  The uneven joins between the upper and lower sections of cladding will be filled and sanded for a smooth transition between the vertical and sloped angles.

 

The 1:1200 model does not include an kind of hatch leading onto the gun deck, but I believe that there should be one in the center of this assembly.  That will probably be next in my queue of CAD projects.

 

I have also nearly completed the cladding on the barbette layer.

 

Barbettelevelcladding02_zps272d7d8d.jpg

 

 

The overhang on the barbette sides will be sanded flush and may require a little filler for the transition.   The same for the centerline and hull butts.

 

Next on the list is to get the barbettes ready for mounting on the major facets.

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this is the bit im interested in , how the 3d printer pieces finish up ! had an offer from my sons tech teacher today to use their printer but ay $700 Aus not sure of the definition

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All of my tools are spread between my marital home and my current house.  Unfortunately, my work bench is there and that is where I would usually mount a sanding board to do the large flat areas of the turret, so that part of the project is progressing slowly.  I have a stand for my bench top buffer on order and hopefully will have that up and running by this weekend, so I will be able to report on its effectiveness and that of small rotary tools with buffing compound next week.

 

As for definition, I doubt that any low-end printer will deliver the kind of detail that we are used to in Dystopian Wars models.   As I posted earlier, I have come to believe that the masters for DW are machined rather than printed.

 

If all that I was interested in was 1:1200 scale, I would save my ducats for an 8 axis CNC machine with the best stepper motors available.  

 

For larger scale parts like I'm producing now, the printer has been more than adequate.  Since I do all of my design in Turbo Cad anyway, prototyping is a breeze.  The four or five hour print time is not really a big deal.  I just start the print in the morning, wait to be sure that a good base is laid-down and then head to the office.   When I get home, I pull the finished part off and start the next one.  Depending on the size, I can often do three decent sized pieces in a day.  

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Overall Progress to date:

 

Progress01_zpseaad06f6.jpg

 

 

All Barbettes installed.   Superstructure facings sanded and prepared for Apoxie Sculpt at the transitions. 

 

Next steps are to work on the transitions between the outer cladding and the cladding in the barbette gun recesses.  Then trace, cut and apply the barbette decking.

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Two barbette decks installed.

 

Cut decking material into 5.5 inch squares and laid over barbettes.  Placed layer with insets over squares.  Traced insets from above and barbette profiles from below.  Cut-out profile with scroll saw.

 

The inset portions required a bit of touch-up with a sanding block to fit properly.  Deck overhangs the barbette body intentionally.  It is far easier to sand or cut the piece flush after it is in place than to cut exactly to fit.

 

Decking in place:

 

BarbetteDecking_zps9a3da7da.jpg

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The head on the printer is still awaiting a rebuild. I did no have one of the tools needed on hand. Dealing with tech support at the manufacturer has also been an adventure. They have been extremely responsive, but readi g between the lines, it appears that they have had more than a couple machines mangled by impatient customers.

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"Now I remember why I printed and mounted that template!"

 

The best way to have formed the barbette cut-outs would have been to cut them to rough size and then sand them to final size using sandpaper wrapped around a 1 inch dowel set into a sheet of plywood.  Sand down to the profile testing frequently against a template.

 

That would have been the best way...

 

Being a bit impatient, I decided to sand mine by hand.  Predictably one cut-out ended up badly out of shape by 5mm where it will be noticed.

 

Rebuilding the bungled barbette cut-out:

 

Build-out_zps7738d620.jpg

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no this is the ideal method ... plan... be sensible ... be patient.... oh bugger it if i just give it a quick go by hand.....doh!!!!  this is a formula i'm way to familiar with......but it hones our skill with filler...and teaches us patience for next time...oh bugger it if i give it a quick sand by hand........repeat if necessary :huh:

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