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evilsockmonkeyzed

1:48 Scale Prussian A6-V Build

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Lower layer main cuts and sanding pretty much done. Now for the two upper layers.

Lower deck layer with layout lines:

LowerDeckwithlayoutlines.jpg

Upper Deck with layout lines:

Blankwithlayoutlines.jpg

Waste sections cut from both blanks with bandsaw. Two center sections were then glued up to allow for sanding of the fore and aft faces.

While it would have been possible to use a scroll saw to remove the interior waste (where the main turret will be placed) on the lower deck, cutting the "rails" completely away from the center section makes sanding and cladding the inside faces much simpler.

Upper and lower decks after cutting and initial gluing:

Upperandlowergluedwithlowerrails.jpg

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crystal.png

There is a brand of instant lemonade that comes in plastic Prussian Smoke Stack Shaped containers. But instead of using them for their (obviously) intended fate as smoke stacks for model ships some people wastefully re-purpose them as holders for eyeglasses ... civilians!

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Time to start working with the wood.

1/64 inch birch plywood cut sightly over sized at top and ends and glued in the barbette turret insets.

At this thickness, the wood is nearly as pliable as styrene sheets. Simple masking tape is more than strong enough to clamp in place.

BarbetteCladdindfront.jpg

It is much easier to trim an oversized piece to size in place than to cut the blank to a precise size and apply accurately.

The over hang visible in the picture below can be trimmed with a flush cut saw or even a hobby knife using the top face of the layer as a guide.

BarbetteCladdingRear.jpg

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The Search For The Perfect Smokestack

Part 2:

lays-stax-original.gif

I could not find a top down view of one of these. If memory serves these are the general size of a Pringle can but most of the cross-section is a pure oval. Now if it were tilted a little and trimmed.

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Barbettes:

Two 2 inch foam blocks glued-up and ripped to 160 mm. Centerline laid out to simplify later marking.

Blank.jpg

Blank cut into 70 mm sections. Centerlines from block connected across front and back faces.

CutBlank.jpg

Cut lines and profiles added to each block.

Cutslaidout.jpg

The long straight line on the face above is the angle where the barbette meets the face of the hull. The shorter line establishes the angle of the lower transition from the body of the barbette to the hull.

After the straight cuts:

cutblock.jpg

The block is then reassembled using masking tape to provide flat surfaces for cutting the profiles.

After the profiles are cut, the basic barbettes are nearly complete:

Allcutsfinished.jpg

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that is one very complicated step that i'm not sure people who dont scratchbuild would appreciate. im also impressed with your constant progress . the way i tend to work i would have been distracted about half way to where you are now and begin roughing out the next (never to be finished) project and so on ...and thanks for sharing

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Holidays and a 2 week bout of the flu have slowed my progress quite a bit. Have the plywood for the shell and recently received my new 3d printer so should be spooling up again soon.

 

holiday good ...... flu bad ........3d printer could go either way .....hope you enjoyed your holidays......i've had a month off and cant remember where i left my motivation .... will watch your continued progress with baited breath

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I had a strange proto-flu [?]  I was out and about on a Saturday afternoon. I pulled into the car park (parking lot) of a grocery store. Thought about getting out and going inside. Decided I did not feel good enough.

 

So I drove home, staggered inside, crawled into bed, popped a brace of Tylenols[TM] just in time for the chills to start. Every joint ached. I stayed under a blanket for about 4 hours. I got up long enough to watch Dr. Who. Crashed again.. ..and sixteen hours later it went away, whatever it was.

 

No other symptoms. Just joint aches, chills, and about 16 hours of fatigue. :huh:

 

Two Tylenol foil the flu? :unsure:

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I wish it had been only 16 hours!  Mine had most of the same symptoms, but lasted more like 72 hours with cold-like symptoms continuing for another week and one half.  To add to the fun, Her Imperial Majesty had it as well.  Let us just say that she has no concept of the "stiff upper lip" and suffers nothing in silence.  Genetic Transmission Unit (GUT tm) X2 caught it as well and stayed with us while Atilla the Mom was off somewhere.

 

To top off the month, GUTtm X1's best friend's boyfriend died last week, so we have been doing the viewing and funeral thing.  17 year old boy collapsed at school in the band room while practicing trombone with no one present and aspirated vommit.  So, in addition to the initial shock, we may be having another difficult discussion after toxicology results are returned.

 

I am quite happy to see January 2013 into the past.

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Back in the saddle again.

 

Cladding barbettes with 1/64 inch birch plywood.  First step, application of strips to upped, vertical section.  

 

BasicCladding_zps4a99de97.jpg

 

 

In the background you can see one of my dual-use DW island/DL Badlands rock formations.  Blue board and Apoxie Sculpt.

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Upper cladding glued onto barbettes. Applying two part white Apoxie Scupt hardening clay to lower sections of Barbettes.

Apoxie Sculpt dries significantly harder tha Green Stuff and can be tooled sanded and drilled like Milliput. It is sginificantly less expensive than either and can be purchased in larger lots.

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sounds interesting ! i use a lot of car "bog" for larger jobs goes on like toothpaste but sets as hard as fibreglass . i do believe you americans call it "bondo"  gives a great finish and is relatively cheap

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good point , i used to work in the special effects industry where they supplied us with stabilised foam ( as used in surfboard production ) which handles it fine but is damm expensive . the real trick is rough shaping it as it hardens to a "plasticine " texture before it sets too hard . Still loving your work :)

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Second section of bottom cladding applied.

 

For a better butt joint with first section, rather than holding in place with masking tape, I clamped the second section in place with 1x4 pine stock.  Wax paper was laid over the cladding to avoid the cladding from becoming glued to the top spreaders.

 

BottomCladding02Clamped_zps9146ac61.jpg

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