Jump to content
Redcoat

Looking for Advice on Modelling

Recommended Posts

I am just getting started with  WWX and have the Red Oak starter set and a box of Bandit Cutthroats and Gunmen. But before I start to assemble the models I just wanted to check if I am doing anything wrong.

The plan is;

1. Assemble models with polystyrene cement.

2. Spray paint undercoat (white or black?).

3. Simple paint job. Washes to bring out detail. Drybrush highlights.

4. Simple basing . Sand and glue , drybrushed to bring out texture.

Does anyone see anything drastically wrong with this approach? Is there anything obvious that I am missing?

Any and all advice appreciated!

Eric

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After gluing let them sit for several hours then give them a quick scrub with a soft toothbrush and warm soapy water. It makes a noticable difference for clean priming. Otherwise your procedure sounds fine by me! The decision to base on black or white will usually come down to your colours being more muted with black primer or having very standout colours with white primer. Think the difference between a piece of red painted metal fresh out of the paintbooth vs that same red a decade later

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Few thoughts to add:

1) Before you assemble you will first want to clean off the mould lines on the model. These lines are where the two halves the mould meet when its being cast. Depending on the material, the mould and also the age of the mould the lines can be quite distinct or very to nearly impossible to see (generally the newer the mould the less). 

You can file them with a simple small hobby file; you can scrape them either with a mould line remover or a scalpel blade. My personal choice is a scalpel blade where one scrapes very slowly and gently to remove the line (I prefer files on metal). Mould line removers work well and tend to "catch" a little less than a blade will (since they are not sharp).

2) Plastics "tend to" not have problems with gaps, though a bit of GreenStuff can be good to have to hand incase there is a minor gap that requires filling. 

3) As these are plastic they shouldn't require washing. Washing tends to be more a required step for resin or metal models where warm soapy water and an old toothbrush are used to clean off the mould release agents (if not done it can mess up glue and paint). Plastics typically don't require this.

4) Undercoating is typically done with white undercoat spray. White being easier to paint onto; some very dark paint schemes can work better with black; or those that are mostly metallics; however if in doubt white is best. 

5) Your paint and basing approach sounds sensible; though if you want to detail I would still put the painting all before working on the base (as you have done above). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like a good plan.

I assembled mine and based them before undercoating them (I use a water based glue to fix the model railway ballast and the undercoat allows me to paint over it).

I black undercoated all of them (I use black spray on most of my figures unless they are going to be white or light coloured) and used a "Dust" spray on the four humans.

I used greenstuff to fix an assembly issue with Jesse's head (BYLB!) And add larger rocks on the bases.

I did have some adhesion issues between the base and the feet, I ended up drilling and pinning with plastic rod on a couple of them.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.