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Stephan

Aquan Battlestation

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I'm not entirely happy about how this turned out, but I thought I'd post for anyone else thinking of putting one of these together.  The main resin parts of this model were really simple, just hemispheres with detail, and it's pretty nice detail.  the problems came in with the hole for mounting the model on the flight stand and on putting the two halves together with the acrylic pieces.

 

I don't have a drill-press at home, so I had to free-hand the drill to deepen the mounting hole.  I got close, but the model still sits a little off kilter.  Spartan, this is really an endemic problem among your models.  I've had to drill out the mounting holes (stop giggling) on at least half of my models, and it's always hit or miss as to whether the model sits evenly on the peg afterwards.  Please, please, please figure out how to fix this issue.

 

Regarding the acrylic pieces, those are just a pain to work with.  I've been in the hobby for over 20 years and have figured out most things, but those pieces gave me fits.  It started with the painting.  I painted them separately from the rest of the model, so that gave me some breathing room, but it seemed paint just didn't want to dry onto the acrylic surface.  The acrylic also doesn't seem to react well to my standard super glue that I've used for assembly on everything from every other game producer for two decades. 

 

In the area of actual assembly, the two halves of the station don't actually fit together in such a way that you can simply slot in the acrylic pieces.  No, that would be too simple.  In final assembly, there's a gap between the two hemispheres that you either have to fill with something or you have to rely on the dodgy structural integrity of the acrylic pieces themselves to hold the whole thing together.  I chose to fill the center with Milliput, which worked really well for getting the two pieces to fit together at just the right distance to let me slot in the acrylic pieces.

 

Last, there are four holes in the top of each half of the hemispheres that were just begging to have something done with them.  I drilled them out, clipped some toothpicks down to size, and then inserted them as a bit of extra detail.

 

gallery_268_506_28452.jpg

 

gallery_268_506_2889.jpg

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I'm not crazy about the green either but I do have the problem with the mounting holes being so shallow that many models are very unstable sitting on the pegs.

3mm drill bit and a standard pinvice.

The flight stand rods are 3mm so a 3mm drill bit can be used to make any flight hole a little deeper for a more secure fit.

Also the green looks fine on the ships, on the battlestation it looks odd but at the same time I get a really strong reminder of those older classic comic or pulp fiction era space artworks.

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I've never found it to be an issue. I've drilled every ship hole deeper no matter what to help with stability. I also replace the acrylic rob with steel so it's sturdy as hell. Never needed a drill press.

I really like the color scheme. The things sticking off the battle station look a little too much like birthday candles for my taste. The purple with the green and magenta is just downright pretty. I would probably consider a black, blue, or purple wash over the purple before the highlights. It tones down the drybrush clalkiness some. So does a varnish spray, I have found.

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The acrylic parts are a pain in the behind with all the Battlestations.

 

Regarding the mounting holes; I don't know what kind of drill you use, but a pin vice offers much more control when it comes to tasks like this.

 

And I'm NOT a fan of the toothpicks, but otherwise a splendid job Stephan, well done ;)

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In my experiences most metals, resins and plastics for models are soft enough for a pin-vice to drill into without much trouble. Metals are harder, they take a bit more work and sometimes if you're drilling a larger diameter its better to use a smaller drill first to do a deep pilot hole.

For Spartan which is mostly resins the pin-vice is the go-to-tool.

If one were to use a drill I would suggest one with variable speeds so that you can pick a very slow speed to work with

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I've got a pin vice drill. The challenge isn't the size or speed of the drill. The challenge is getting the hole straight so the model mounts properly.

 

You just look at the drill / pin-vice from the side, at a right angle, and regularly turn the miniature 90 degrees along the axes of the drill / pin-vice during drilling, to make sure you've still got both axes right.

 

Hope that makes sense...

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