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darkjedi203

The 'where/what/why/how does this work' thread

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I'm sure a lot of us have questions about what's what on some of our models, packed with detail as they are. Or how something would work in the DWars world. This thread is where you would post these questions to be answered by other members of the forum who could have a plausible explanation. This is mostly intended to be 'headcanon', but if a Spartan jumps in with an official explanation, all the better! 

Apart from questions, also feel free to post your own observations/headcanon about other Dystopian Wars stuff as well.

So to start things off, I'm curious about boarding. How would it work? Are the assault troops the same as the jetpack-armed guys from Dystopian Legions? I don't know how that would work every. Sure it works if you have a marine detachment on a ship. But it doesn't make sense on a model like the Ritter tank..the thing has a drawbridge on it! Why would jetpack troops need a drawbridge? And do the jetpack troops ditch their jetpacks once they get onto the enemy ship/vehicle? Because I'd imagine it would get rather cumbersome for those samurai otherwise. But then how would they get back in case of a failed assault?

Thoughts? 

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I'm happy to jump in and answer any questions about the world, and will enjoy reading other peoples' rationalizations as well... given that I can't keep the entire DWars world in my head! :P

 

Interesting note on the boarding troops, as that's not one I've truly considered.... I always assumed that they were the jetpack armed guys from Legions, as that made sense to me. Also note that the Ritter boarding ramp may not be intended as a siege ramp in that it crashes down on the ramparts of an opposing vessel... it might be better considered a run-way. Imagine behind the steel blast doors a battalion of Prussian luftlancers, waiting for the light to go green. With a hiss of pneumatic pressure the armoured plates fold back, and the light bathes them in an acidic glow. As the ramp crashes down they are greeted by the shining sun, and immersed in the sounds of battle and a skyline lit by tracer fire and the puffs of explosions. Up ahead aircraft describe lazy contrails in their eerily graceful dance of death. The officer yells incoherently, and the rest follow him out, boots clanging on the gang-way as they rush up the incline. As they reach the apex, they hit their jump controls and are boosted into the air. Up ahead lies their target, the looming Kursk Class Land-Dreadnought like some predator city, all guns blazing as it rolls inexorably towards the Wolfgang Fortresses. AA fire begins to stitch its way up as the jump troops reach the crest of their arc.... several fall away like tumbling autumn leaves, or else spiral uncontrollably off course as rounds shed power cables and control links. Then they are falling, the Kursk grows bigger and bigger and its gangwalks become clearer and clearer. Legs are braced and lances charged.... a final burst of acceleration and then CLANG! Blood and Iron.

 

+

 

That's how it appears in my head anyway. :P

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I'm happy to jump in and answer any questions about the world, and will enjoy reading other peoples' rationalizations as well... given that I can't keep the entire DWars world in my head! :P

 

Interesting note on the boarding troops, as that's not one I've truly considered.... I always assumed that they were the jetpack armed guys from Legions, as that made sense to me. Also note that the Ritter boarding ramp may not be intended as a siege ramp in that it crashes down on the ramparts of an opposing vessel... it might be better considered a run-way. Imagine behind the steel blast doors a battalion of Prussian luftlancers, waiting for the light to go green. With a hiss of pneumatic pressure the armoured plates fold back, and the light bathes them in an acidic glow. As the ramp crashes down they are greeted by the shining sun, and immersed in the sounds of battle and a skyline lit by tracer fire and the puffs of explosions. Up ahead aircraft describe lazy contrails in their eerily graceful dance of death. The officer yells incoherently, and the rest follow him out, boots clanging on the gang-way as they rush up the incline. As they reach the apex, they hit their jump controls and are boosted into the air. Up ahead lies their target, the looming Kursk Class Land-Dreadnought like some predator city, all guns blazing as it rolls inexorably towards the Wolfgang Fortresses. AA fire begins to stitch its way up as the jump troops reach the crest of their arc.... several fall away like tumbling autumn leaves, or else spiral uncontrollably off course as rounds shed power cables and control links. Then they are falling, the Kursk grows bigger and bigger and its gangwalks become clearer and clearer. Legs are braced and lances charged.... a final burst of acceleration and then CLANG! Blood and Iron.

 

+

 

That's how it appears in my head anyway. :P

Thank you! This is what the DW rule book and campaign guides have been missing!

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Go on, let's show some real technobabble.

 

Shield Generators

Excerpt from an essay by Prof. Hiram Evans, Covenant of Antarctica, specialist in recent technological history, "Element-270: The Universal Catalyst", 1870

"One of the earliest properties discovered in Element-270 was its similarity to the properties exhibited by the electromagnet- it is capable of attracting and repelling objects via an invisible force. One of the most important differences between this 'Sturginium Magnet' and a traditional magnet is the nature of materials it affects. The Sturginium Magnet repels any material that does not contain a minimum percentage Sturginium...

When placed into a fluid state, using extreme heat and a molten fluoride salt based medium, the Sturginium Magnet will exhibit its properties when the proper electrical charge is applied. By modulating the electrical charge, different densities of material can be affected, with less dense materials requiring relatively more charge to repel... The most common implementation of the Molten Salt Sturginium Electromagnet is in the recently created "Shield Generator" devices. As most ordnance in the world today is comprised of high-density, low-sturginum materials, a relatively low charge through the Sturginum Magnet will project a protective bubble through which bullets and shells cannot pass, rendering vessels invulnerable to non-sturginium infused munitions."

Although somewhat over-exaggerating the strength of the Shield Generator, the professor's essay is otherwise correct. As experience in the field has shown, the Shield Generator is not quite impervious, as battlefield conditions are not as predictable as the scientist's laboratory.

 

To anyone who knows anything about actual science, I say "Sturginium."

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Professor Evans hypothesis was indeed correct when it was originally published... most scientists however now agree that Element 270 is most effective for the production of various effects when in gaseous form. An electromagnetic charge passed through a variety of Sturgene gas concentrations results in quantifiable and observable effects. The most stable of these, now often referred to as the 'Evans Mixture', results in the shield generator effect that repels and slows oncoming projectiles given a continuous source of power. Less common alchemical products result in disruptions in local gravitational effects, a localized optical disruption or even a nullifying effect that 'dampens' the fields of other generators; all, we must add, requiring the production and storage of potentially unstable Sturgene gas concentrations as well as a power source capable of providing a stable and contained electromagnetic field.

 

Indeed, the most time consuming and powerful of generators takes these properties to the extreme. Russian Mimic Generators operate on the principle that by observing the emanations of opponents' generators, one can deduce the chemical composition of the gas involved and replicate it. This is not an exact science, and has to be done 'on the fly' by teams of scientists. When it works, however, either through luck or skill, such Mimic devices can produce almost any field if they possess the required quantities of known materials used in Sturgene Concentrations and can deduce the correct field strength required. It is a testament both to Russian scientists and their military intelligence services that they are capable of such replication so often.

 

The most extreme and power consuming use of Sturgene gas in this way are the Covenant's teleport generators. These require dedicated power coils way beyond the capacity of most warships (and indeed most nations) and also require an anchoring point (the science of which is not currently understood. At least certainly there are theories about 'duplicate particles' and 'sympathetic bonds' ) that involves a similarly charged compound of gas for the generator to lock onto. 

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Actually, the teleporter is one of the few generators with some explanation of how it works- if I could just find where it was. I definitely remember that being an electrically reactive liquid. On the plus side, I did find in the old CoA booklet for 1.0/1.1 the following about Iron Men:

They feature "...a rudimentary 'nervous system' based on a mercury-sturginium liquid alloy"

 

From the 2.0 Commodore edition, we have the Sturginium-Gel anti-gravity repulsine, which keeps the less aerodynamic flyers of DW in the sky.

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How different are torpedoes in the DW world compared to their real world counterparts? Whats the in-universe explanation for the KOB not being able to fire torpedoes at RB1? 

EDIT: I am hungry for more info.

 

  • How do Speerschleuders work? is there any special snowflake tech behind it?
  • How does EoBTS (or any other factions) incendiary munitions work? Are their shells super hot? 
  • Going by the scale of the Faust in Dystopian Legions - the scale of landships are immense! The Mk2 Armstrong itself would be huge! How accurate is this extrapolation? 

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Speerschleuder weapons would be given a very high electromagnetic charge, which then discharges upon impact. The copper rod that forms the conduit for later Tesla attacks is not much different from a sabot round.

Incendiary munitions are most likely white phosphorus rounds (look it up, it's nasty stuff).

Yes, the models are huge.

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I've always personally thought that Britannian torpedoes were a product of stubborness.

 

"You see Darling the Ministry of Defence got a really good deal on these torpedoes. Yes I understand that we overpaid, and that they weren't delivered on time, and they're not as good as those other fellows' but by thunder we bought a lot of them and we're going to use them!"

 

More seriously I've kind of head cannoned them as older, stockpiled torpedoes. Makes sense with the logistics involved in the Dystopian Royal Navy. 

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Different factions have different propulsion methods and payloads on their torps.

I imagine British torps take a little travel time before they arm themselves and so are unable to be effective in RB1. That, Or they havnt build up enough speed to effectively damage an enemy model in RB1.

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KoB Torps

1)

Historically in the real world,  torpedoes only arm after having travelling a set distance, normally determined by XXX many revolutions of their propeller. This is to avoid impact fuses triggering when torpedoes dropped by aircraft or launched from tubes above the waterline meet the water at speed!

 

Clearly in  this version of the 1870s, the Royal Navy mainly use a fairly conservative minimum range setting.

 

 

 or

 

 

2)

 KoB torps use a basic homing mechanism, which require an amount of time to acquire their target. To avoid incidents of torpedoes locking onto their own ship, or other friendly vessels, they are limited to fixed channels and a considerable minimum range.

 

Torpedo turrets and SAS dropped torpedoes can be aimed much more accurately without this guidance, and without turning the whole ship,  so may use simpler and cheaper dumb torpedoes instead, that can be armed at much shorter ranges! Without guidance, they have more room for their warhead, allowing a larger warhead in the case of the torp turrets, and a considerable and significant weight saving for the SAS!

 

 

Faster torpedoes

There are various ways of making torpedoes harder to counter. Simply making them faster is obvious, but making them harder to observe in the first place, or harder to predict their path  is also highly effective. Good examples of this are the bubble control technology fitted to reduce the visibility of the trails, and the 'kicker' torpedo, aimed to miss, and make a radical course correction close to the target, too late for evasive action.....

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Actually, the teleporter is one of the few generators with some explanation of how it works- if I could just find where it was. I definitely remember that being an electrically reactive liquid. On the plus side, I did find in the old CoA booklet for 1.0/1.1 the following about Iron Men:

They feature "...a rudimentary 'nervous system' based on a mercury-sturginium liquid alloy"

 

From the 2.0 Commodore edition, we have the Sturginium-Gel anti-gravity repulsine, which keeps the less aerodynamic flyers of DW in the sky.

 

Indeed, and sometimes I have a hell whale of a time making sure I don't contradict something I, or someone else, wrote for Spartan before! (Whilst at the same time bowing to the fact that anything I do write can be retconned whenever that is needed) :P

 

To be honest, and this is the way I've always approached it even before I started writing parts of it.... the Dystopian Wars world is a take it or leave it affair. Those bits you like, enjoy! Those bits you hate.... create your own story :)

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So I just got my copy of Operation Sirocco and Storm of Steel. Darn, these look really gorgeous! Are there any plans to make more of such books for 2.0? I've just glanced through them and am already hooked! 

 

Can't wait to finish work and dive into the details. :D

 

Just curious, what is it with wind related books?

 

STORM of Steel

Pacific CYCLONE
HURRICANE Season
Operation SIROCCO

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So I just got my copy of Operation Sirocco and Storm of Steel. Darn, these look really gorgeous! Are there any plans to make more of such books for 2.0? I've just glanced through them and am already hooked! 

 

Can't wait to finish work and dive into the details. :D

 

Just curious, what is it with wind related books?

 

STORM of Steel

Pacific CYCLONE

HURRICANE Season

Operation SIROCCO

I'm hoping for more too - I really enjoy the campaign books.

 

As a theme it seems to hint towards KAMIKAZE  ;)

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I'm hoping for more too - I really enjoy the campaign books.

 

As a theme it seems to hint towards KAMIKAZE  ;)

 

The EotBS attack on Panama, maybe?

 

It would be a good name for a military operation - its just that our modern perception of the word has been tainted a little...

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Anyone have any ideas about how the brit subs work? Chainsawing the enemy ship seems believable enough, but how would they actually manage to disentangle themselves and get to the other side of the ship without damaging anything on the sub (like the exhaust port)? 

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As a sub I'd expect they dive a little to pass under the enemy ship, chewing up the hull as it passes underneath.

Once the pointy bits have done their work they could just dive a few more metres to get the rear end of the sub clear and pop out the other side.

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Anyone have any ideas about how the brit subs work? Chainsawing the enemy ship seems believable enough, but how would they actually manage to disentangle themselves and get to the other side of the ship without damaging anything on the sub (like the exhaust port)? 

 Look at the way the teeth run- along the top, they would go front to back, just the same way as a real chainsaw.

 

NOTE- This is not advice on how to use a chainsaw. Have hands on lessons from people who know what they are doing. Do not cut your own legs off. 

 

If you have ever used a chainsaw, you'll know if you cut with the top of the blade (Not good practice very often!, instead of the teeth  grabbing into the object, and pulling the saw safely into the cut, it instead tends to  make the saw want to bounce off- distinctly unhelpful if your legs are there, but quite handy if you don't want the saw to get stuck in the object.

Given the curved shape of the sub nose approximates to that of a chainsaw bar nose, you could reasonably get a similar effect, of contact pulling the sub clear of the target.

 

James

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I've got a mental image of a KoB torpedo being rather like the 'drill bot' from tomorrow never dies, but instead of being steered to apply the drills to the hull, embeds itself with a harpoon like projection at the front. This explains both the piercing and long-range of the weapon, as it does not build up enough speed to embed at short range. 

 

As for the chainsaw subs... assuming they work like a normal chainsaw, they cut backwards along the length of the sub, adding weight to the idea that they pass slightly under their target to tear out thebottom of the hull (A relatively weak point on a real ship, as most nations would focus their armor at or above the waterline)

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