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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/11/2013 in all areas

  1. I got a chance to put some paint to model this weekend. Thanks to Tank0625 for the inspiration. (Sorry for the crappy cell pics)
    2 points
  2. More links at the top of the page which go directly to the game indicated would be great. I think it's a great start. Actually, I would really like to see the same sort of big graphic "GETTING STARTED" button on the main Spartan page which goes to brief overviews of all the games on a single page, each game with a graphic to click as a link to more details as opposed to the drop-down list from the navigation bar across the top of the current Spartan webpage. Also, how about a button to "CONTACT YOUR LOCAL VANGUARD" for interested players to find a demo game scheduled in their local area?
    2 points
  3. Post Edited. The link below will take you to the topic where you can download it. http://community.spartangames.co.uk/index.php?/topic/691-santys-quick-reference-sheet-thing/page-1
    1 point
  4. Hi all After many months of planning I've finally started my video series on how to play Dystopian Wars. The first video that I've just uploaded talks about line of sight and firing arcs. The video is attached below or you can find it on my Youtube Channel - just search for Peter Fontebasso or here is the link http://www.youtube.com/user/thefont123?feature=guide. Look forward to any comments or suggestions. Thanks
    1 point
  5. I used 2 squadrons of fresnel a and in 4 turns only 1 squadron managed too you the generator once in the entire game I found them a big points sink for very little effect
    1 point
  6. I think its virtually an empirical fact that the FSA are the best overall faction. Fortunately they are so good noone in our gaming group wants to play them. Its not fun having a clear advantage over everyone else So I never actually have to play against them. Next best at the point level we tend to play at (which is around 600-800 points) has to be the EoBS.
    1 point
  7. This dreadnought is part of a commission job that I just completed. I think it came out pretty good for a simple tabletop quality project. More pics on my blog, http://dystopianwarspainting.blogspot.co.uk/
    1 point
  8. That is my standard list 2x Ika 3x Tanuki 5x Fujin 4x Uwatsu + filler Straightforward, agile, fast, decent long range and short range firepower. For variety I may throw in a carrier or sky fortress depending.
    1 point
  9. I imagine that for a release it would be altered from the parts of the dread, and probably come with added drop-on parts. Excellent post! Thank you for bringing something new to the discussion; 5/5 stars, would read your posts again. Seriously though; the thread's less than a page long, it would've taken you two minutes to read it and not look like some kind of post-collating robot.
    1 point
  10. Sorry, was just asking for it...
    1 point
  11. Yes, linking confuses lots of people on the forums but the solution is to politely point it out when you see something wrong and it's gotten most everyone on the right page.
    1 point
  12. Solodice

    A Taste Of Dystopia

    I think it might be time to introduce the Royal Marines of the 46th Air Group during the rear guard action at Toronto but not after Wolfe gives them a good ol' thrashing. Wolfe will be back in due time to show the French that "Britannia owns the skies not those goddamn frogs!"
    1 point
  13. I don't think that this needs any "official ruling". It's quite clear once you start focusing on what you cannot do rather than what you can do. In the above example a HALF out of 3 is 1.5. You CAN have less than 1.5 heavy cruisers in your fleet, but you CAN NOT have more than 1.5 heavy cruisers in your fleet. So if all your ships in the fleet are cruisers and they are a squadron of 3, you can include 1 heavy cruiser, but cannot include 2 or more. Arguing with rounding up or dividing by zero is just stretching the matter in order to get around a simple rule IMHO.
    1 point
  14. Cambrius

    A Taste Of Dystopia

    I will be continuing the adventures of General Aries and the chronicle of Captain Black; I wanted to be sure others had the chance to contribute their perspectives as well. Great stuff so far. Avanti!
    1 point
  15. Don't look at me, I had nothing to do with it
    1 point
  16. Looks like u just posted my standard list lol
    1 point
  17. I'd like them to have an aircraft carrier based on the rhine hull but without the tesla weapons and an improved broadside, I think it would make a solid center point to a smaller fleet
    1 point
  18. MythicKhan

    A Taste Of Dystopia

    I am very impressed by how this Quebec campaign has seized everyone's imaginations. Some really great pieces here! Well done to all! I now present the last part of the timeline, do let me know what you think. I tried to give us a little bit of armoured clash in there, as well as draw the curtain on the campaign in such a way as to leave honours equal. Please feel free to add your own events to the timeline, in and around the general scheme below (I know that the Benning's adventures, for example, are not included here!) Enjoy! [Also note, that American commander Methuselah Khan is now Methuselah Kilroy, I thought the former was a bit too much!] Timeline Continued 10th-16th October - The FEF launches 'Operation Charge', the longest period of linked offensive action thus far. de Loire and her commanders send forth rapid columns of tanks supported by air assets into the CDF lines. By the third day they have broken through. Units are left to anchor the line against the defenders in Ottawa, but otherwise the FEF advances as before. Many CDF units earn battle honours as they continue to retreat in good order. On the 16th, the FEF has reached Perth, Portland and Seeley's Bay. Ney leads the carrier Richelieu and naval assets into Lake Ontario, bombarding Kingston as he does so. 17th October - Lull in the fighting. The CDF is reorganized in the face of the Lake Ontario advance. General Kilroy begins amassing forces in Rochester for an amphibious assault on the exposed flank of the French advance. In the light of French naval superiority on the lake, however, Operation Dagger is placed on ice as units from across the States travel to designated depots. 18th October - Canadian commander Griesbach and Britannian commander Bamforth establish a defensive cordon in Toronto. At the same time, the FEF commanders review their strategy. With reinforcements crossing the Atlantic in a trickle, Guilard is tempted to halt the advance. His subordinates persuade him against a course of action that will effectively cede initiative to the defenders. de Loire and Du Guesclin argue that a continued strike along the Great Lakes and the capture of Detroit will persuade the FSA to leave the fight. 19th October - Events seem to bear out de Loire's hopes. The State governments of Washington, Idaho and Oregon inform President Adams that their territorial forces will not take part in the Quebec War. Whilst this power is within the States' remit, it is the first time it has been exercised. President Adams intimates to General Kilroy that unless the war can be brought to a successful conclusion, the FSA may have to withdraw from the fight. General Kilroy responds with the word 'Nuts!' 20th-22nd October - French advance resumes. Toronto besieged. 23rd October - Britannian 20th Battle Squadron arrives off the Canadian coast. It is joined by the Canadian 3rd Fleet and the 8th Federal Fleet. The formation is known as 1st Combined Fleet, but for now it remains at sea. On the same day, French forces attack in the First Battle of Toronto. They are beaten off. 24th October - de Loire sends a flanking force, led by the Fraternitie. The ship is severely damaged, but succeeds in threatening the CDF's supply lines. Aware that their position is becoming untenable, Griesbach and Bamforth reluctantly abandon Toronto. 25th October - Second Battle of Toronto. Rearguard elements cause out of proportion damage to the French advance forces. de Loire removes several commanders for incompetence after they fall into an ambush in Bedford Park. 26th October - Canadian guerrillas operating in the Kingston area manage to send a message to CDF high command, requesting supplies. Griesbach declines to help, marshalling as he is the retreat from Toronto. General Kilroy is less willing to leave the irregulars 'flapping in the wind'. He orders recon flights over the Kingston area, and determines to try an amphibious re-supply operation. 27th October - Ney draws his fleet to the Western end of Lake Ontario to bombard Hamilton. Kilroy seizes his chance and sends a detachment across the lake right under the noses of the French. Armoured cruisers travelling down the St. Lawrence come under sustained aerial attack to pin them in place, and the landing (codenamed Operation Dirk) is a complete success. The landed force links up with the guerrillas and causes considerable damage on de Loire's supply chain. The French never discover the amphibious component of the Operation. 28th - 30th October - de Loire is forced to hold position as her supply line is reinforced. The CDF realizes that the weight of the French advance will simply smash asunder their hastily constructed defences. Griesbach withdraws too Hanover, out of the French line of advance, and digs in, calling for reinforcements from all across Canada as he does so. Bamforth takes his command toward Detroit, and Kilroy transfers there too. Units from all across the FSA are funnelled to Detroit. 31st October - 19th Battle Squadron strikes at French re-supply convoys carrying new Grele and Arbalete tanks for the FEF, as well as new recruits. Guilard is incensed and orders Ney to deal with the problem. The Directoire and her support elements set sail to find and destroy the 19th Battle Squadron. 1st November-3rd November - de Loire resumes her rapid advance. She reaches London by the afternoon of the 3rd. The CDF melts away before her and she begins to scent victory. Recon flights from La Victoire quickly put paid to her hopes. Detroit is now an armed camp. French units note Griesbach's command, but fatally decide that the Canadian forces have been shattered. Du Guesclin details an aerial fleet led by the Hussard to keep watch, but they do not engage. At the same time, Operation Gauntlet is begun. The 1st Combined Fleet launches itself down the St. Lawrence. 4th-6th November - Operation Gauntlet causes untold damage to French communication towers and positions along the river. 1st Combined Fleet does not escape unscathed, and comes under continuous attack. On the morning of the 6th, however, it makes it into Lake Ontario. Ney is furious, and rapidly orders his ships on the Lake to consolidate. Naval superiority, however, has already been lost. Du Guesclin retaliates with Operation Allouette. He remarks 'the skies belong to France. If they want them, let them come and take it.' For the next week the French fly continuous sorties, every time a CDF vessel takes to the skies it is met with a French response. de Loire resumes her advance. 9th November - de Loire reaches the outskirts of Detroit. Alarums sound across the city and General Kilroy transfers to the mobile airfield FSLS Lansing of the Michigan State Land Fleet. The flamboyant Sky-Captain Archibald J. Semmes of the Californian Sky Fleet arrives aboard the Valley Class FSAS Archangel. When asked whether he had received orders to transfer to Detroit he would only reply 'I'm here to kill the French.' The first of many probing counter-attacks are made against the encamped FEF, but most result in disaster. 19th Battle Squadron is finally cornered by Directoire, engaged, and all but destroyed. French supply convoys arrive mostly unscathed in Quebec from hereon, but they are still too few for Guilard to be happy. 10th-11th November - First Battle of Lake Ontario. Ney battles with the 1st Combined Fleet in the largest naval action of the war so far. It is inconclusive, but it cedes naval initiative to the CDF. The Richelieu withdraws downriver out of the lake. Guilard orders du Guesclin to cease Operation Allouette, because 'the flyboys are burning through my stores!' 12th November - de Loire now possesses outside Detroit the largest gathering of French armour since the campaign began. Opposing her is the largest concentration of American armour since the Civil War. Peace overtures by Guilard to the CDF are rebuffed. 13th November - 21st November - The two sides engage in an armoured clash that goes down in history. Eight days of constant fighting dawns on the 13th, when de Loire launches her first sledgehammer blow. Shells rain on Detroit and the defenders rush to battle in tanks, planes and airships. Hundreds die in the first day alone. The bunkers Tag One through Four on the outskirts of the city hold for most of the day, but on the dawn of the 14th Tag Two is rent asunder by heat lances from French breakthrough tanks. The towers around the bunker are soon similar destroyed. Tag One and Four are destroyed over the next few days as massed formations of armour boil across the shell-shattered landscape. Over the heads of the fighters, the airships Lancier and Cuirassier duel with the FSAS Archangel and other aerial units. On the 15th the defenders have their first major success when the mobile airfield La Gloire is destroyed in a cataclysmic explosion, but still the French push on. Tanks roll of the Detroit Arms Factory production line and straight into battle as the French pierce the city boundaries on the American left flank. Defiance Class Robots recently released from Federal Armouries are rushed in to deal with the breach in the line, and reserve troops doggedly attempt to hold the bridges. A pall of black smoke hangs over the battlefield and still the battle rages. The Lansing and La Victoire exchange long range fire on the 16th, whilst Kilroy launches a left-hook led by Tennessee class landships and supported by armoured trains. The assault is stymied by French medium and light tanks. The 17th sees the least fighting as both sides recuperate. Tag Three remains sound, and the landships of the Michigan State Land Fleet stand like isolated mountains amidst a roiling sea of fire. Still more units are plunged into the cauldron over the next few days, surgical strikes followed by massive charges, then feints and every trick in the book. General Kilroy and General William Peters Howell of the Michigan State forces are everywhere at once, shoring up the line and directing the stream of desperate reinforcements wherever they are needed. On the 19th November the FSAS Archangel abandons her position over the shattered city and powers out over the battlefield. The defenders watch almost aghast as Captain Semmes leads a solo charge at the French lines. The Lancier and Cuirassier rise to meet him and a titanic duel erupts in the smoke darkened sky. Suddenly the Lancier belches smoke and staggers in the air, before crashing down. The Cuirassier also begins to suffer as the Archangel continues to hammer her. The defenders roar their defiance as the French airship begins to withdraw, but then the Archangel begins to list heavily to port, before descending in a stately manner from the heavens. She fires her guns all the way down. Before she can hit the ground, the defenders abandon their positions and charge. This is no co-ordinated assault, and Kilroy and Howell are left trying to catch up with their troops who rush pell-mell towards de Loire's command. The ferocity of the attack makes up for its lack of organization, and the FEF is pushed back several miles. It dawns on Kilroy that he is tapping the last reserves of strength in his troops. 'It is now or never.' he remarks and orders a general advance. Tag Three's guns fall silent for the first time as the battle moves beyond range. Exhausted Federal troops collapse by the wayside, but the sheer anger of most keeps them going. The burning wreck of the Archangel is also bypassed, saluted by the surging mass of American troops. de Loire is frantic, for the first time flustered in a land engagement. She risks losing all her precious landships in the conflagration that has burst around her. Then the coup-de-grace arrives in the form of Griesbach's Canadian forces. Fresh and equipped with the latest Canadian equipment and troops, the assault shatters the formerly unbreakable French forces. They withdraw in good order, leaving 'one hell of a mess.' Kilroy, when learning of the end of the battle, slumps in his chair and puts his head in his hands. 'What hell hath God unleashed upon us?' he mutters. All around him the Federal forces slump down, exhausted, shattered, and aghast at the destruction around them. The biggest battle fought in North America draws to a close, but there seems to be no real winner in the eyes of the State troops. The pursuit of de Loire falls solely to Griesbach and Bamforth. 22nd November - Kilroy, realizing that the time is now, orders Operation Dagger to commence. If de Loire can be trapped, then the war will effectively be over. Griesbach continues to hound the FEF as it pulls back passed Toronto, the troops securing the supply line peeling back to join the rumbling two landships (Restauration and Reforme) and mobile airfield that is all that remains of de Loire's heavy elements. 23rd-24th November - Bad weather on the lake allows de Loire to continue her withdrawal unmolested. Kilroy sees his opportunity slipping from his grasp. 25th November - Dagger-Day dawns. 1st Combined Fleet runs interference for a massive flotilla of landing craft packed with troops from the States of Utah, Nebraska and Colorado besides Federal units. They land in five places Discovery Bay, Port Hope, Coburg, Brighton and Wellington. They meet fierce resistance, and the green nature of the troops tells against them. In the end only at Brighton is there a substantial breakthrough, and all too soon it is smashed aside by de Loire's withdrawing forces on the 28th. 26th-29th November - Ney's fleet on Lake Ontario makes a break for the St. Lawrence. They are dogged by 1st Combined Fleet, but neither side lands the killing blow, and the French naval forces manage to escape. Out at sea though, the 2nd Combined Fleet has finally been formed, and brings the Directoire to battle. They also savage a French resupply convoy. Guilard urges his commanders to do everything they can to prevent the withdrawal from becoming a rout. 30th November - 5th December - Hounded all the way by Griesbach, de Loire finally reaches Montreal, where advanced parties under Guilard have constructed strong defences. The Turenne hangs over the city, and Griesbach's advance units fall prey to its guns. Griesbach attempts to dislodge the FEF whilst it tries to take up positions in the city, but his efforts are unsuccessful. 7th December - Kilroy, leading the 'Federal Army of the North' composed of both Detroit and Dagger veterans finally catches up with Griesbach and Bamforth. Montreal is placed under siege. A new peace conference is suggested by Guilard, but neither side will budge from their current positions. The only agreement is a winter ceasefire. In the States, President Adams receives word that Idaho, Oregon and Washington have reversed their decision on territorial forces. The FSA is now completely committed to victory. Both sides, however, face their worst case scenario: The CDF faces a consolidated veteran formation, no longer reliant on over-exposed supply lines and in secure positions that will be very costly to retake. The FEF meanwhile stands out on a limb, far from home and facing two hostile powers that continue to build their forces for the final blow. That blow, and whatever form it was going to take, would happen in 1873. Final Comments: All commanders emerged from the first part of the campaign with reputations intact. The real thing worth noting is that Guilard and his commanders misjudged the Federated States attitude to the war. They though that by capturing Detroit and smashing its military forces they would persuade the FSA to leave the war. Instead, the merely convinced the FSA that the FEF was too dangerous to ignore. The discontent with the war in the States had been predicated on it being 'over there' and 'not our fight'. The war became the States' fight after the killing fields of Detroit, and the FEF had to deal with that fact for the rest of the conflict. In France, news of the retreat to Montreal was received coldly, but President Bonaparte remained committed to Guilard and his force in spite of opposition. As General Howell remarked after the Battle of Detroit 'it ain't over yet!'
    1 point
  19. Go to your Gallery and open the picture. Now klick on "options" select "share links" copy the image link. Now if you make a post klick on the Image button and insert the image link you just copied. Now the picture will be included in the post at full size like the following:
    1 point
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